Group H Stars

STARS

Stars are fasinating in their own way. They are differnt shape's and patterns some are also are named after ancient Greek Gods and Godesses.

The video link below puts you on a page where there is a video on information on seeing stars.

http://www.neok12.com/php/watch.php?v=zX42004f656f5176527a6f6b&t=Stars

I didnt know that if the stars were blue they were hot and red cold did you? I also didnt know there were different couler stars too did you see that purple one!

!!WARNING!! REMEMBER NOT TO LOOK INTO THE SUN ESPECIALLY NOT WITH A TELESCOPE! OR YOU MIGHT GO BLIND. DONT EVEN LOOK INTO THE SUN WITH SUNGLASSES ON EITHER.

This link to a coulerful unbeliveble looking shooting star:

http://www.google.co.uk/imgres?hl=en&gbv=2&biw=1600&bih=723&tbm=isch&tbnid=aV0mxpAJRniY6M:&imgrefurl=http://www.telegraph.co.uk/science/picture-galleries/8813653/Shooting-stars-meteor-showers-in-pictures.html&docid=51bKOMDpfE6QyM&imgurl

Astronomers have calculated that the stars in the Milky Way,(the galaxy which the sun belongs in), number in the hundreds of billions. The Milky Way, in turn, is only one of several hundred million galaxies within the viewing range of the larger modern telescopes. The individual stars visible in the sky are simply those that lie closest to the solar system in the Milky Way.

The star nearest to our solar system is the triple star Proxima Centauri, which is about 40 trillion km from earth. In terms of the speed of light, the common standard used by astronomers for expressing distance, this triple-star system is about 4.29 light-years distant; light traveling at about 300,000 km per second takes more than four years and three months to travel from this star to earth.

A Physical Description Of The Sun
The sun is a typical star, with a visible surface called a photosphere, an overlying atmosphere of hot gases, and above them a more diffuse outflowing stream of particles called the solar wind.

Cooler areas of the photosphere, such as the sunspots on the sun, are likely the same on other stars; their existence on some large nearby stars has been identified by a technique called speckle interferometry.

The internal structure of the sun and other stars cannot be directly observed, but studies indicate convection currents and layers of increasing density and temperatures rising until the core is reached where thermonuclear reactions take place.

Stars consist mainly of hydrogen and helium, with varying amounts of heavier elements.

The largest stars known are supergiants with diameters that are more than 400 times that of the sun, whereas the small stars known as white dwarfs have diameters that may be only 0.01 times that of the sun.

Giant stars are usually different, however, and may be only 40 times bigger than the sun, whereas white dwarfs are extremely dense and may have masses about 0.1 times of the sun despite their small size. Supermassive stars are suspected that could be 1000 times bigger than the sun, and, at the lower range, hot balls of gases may exist that are too small to initiate nuclear reactions. One possible such brown dwarf was first observed in 1987, and others have been detected since then.

Star brightness is described in terms of magnitude. The brightest stars may be as much as 1,000,000 times brighter than the sun; white dwarfs are about 1000 times less bright.

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